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Ecuador Itineraries Monthly Round-Up Peru South America

Four Months on the Road in South America – Peru & Ecuador

December 17, 2017

A little over four months in and a little less than two months to go on this massive, diverse continent!  It’s hard to really comprehend just how much we’ve seen but at the same time, the more we speak to other travellers, the more we realise there is to see.

With flights home booked though, all good things must come to an end, so you can bet we’re making the most of the next couple of months.

As always, this post is designed to give you practical tips for your travels through Peru (and the Galapagos) – information regarding costings, transport, accommodation and activities – it’s all in there.

Isn’t it time you began planning your adventure through South America?

If this is the first monthly round-up you’ve read, you may like to check out itinerary and costings for the first, second and third months we spent in South America first.

Puerto Maldanado (the Gateway to the Amazon), Peru

An easy overnight bus (or short flight) from Cusco, Puerto Maldanado is the closest jumping-off point to the Peruvian Amazon.  A visit to the Amazon was always a ‘must-do’ in our eyes and as we made new friends and explored the jungle, there was no doubt we made the right choice in visiting.

Accommodation:  3 nights in a private bungalow at Amazon Planet.  We joined them for the ‘Native Program’ but they have a range of options available – all including food, basic drinks, a guide and activities.  The accommodation itself was comfortable (but not lux) – exactly what you’d hope for in the Amazon.

Activities:  Night jungle treks, boat floats, a visit to a local tribe and plenty of hammock-time, the activities at Amazon Planet were varied and interesting whilst still providing enough downtime in the heat of the day.  Read about our first Amazon experience here.

Onwards travel to Cusco:  Another night, another bus.  This time we paid PEN40 (USD12.35/NZD17.85) each for a salon cama seat (the equivalent of business class on a plane) on Superciva but weren’t quite as impressed.  The toilets were smelly from the moment we stepped aboard and the snacks were very basic.  If Excluciva is running that night, you can definitely expect a much improved service for only PEN10 more – with that said though, there’s not much to do in the centre of Puerto Maldanado so we wouldn’t consider staying an extra night to catch the nicer bus.

Cusco, Peru

With Macchu Pichu behind us, we had a few last activities and hikes to tick off in Cusco before moving on.  A uniquely beautiful city, and one that we came to know fairly well, it was a pleasure spending more time in the cultural capital of Peru.

Accommodation:  Though we enjoyed the first hostel we stayed in, Magic Cusco, it was a little out of town, so upon our return we decided to check another option out – Magicpacker Hostel.  They’ve got a great range of bed configurations available and it’s another example of a perfect social-but-not-party hostel – just what you need after a long day of trekking.  4-bed mixed dorm @ PEN35 each/night (USD10.80/NZD15.60) – fabulous hot showers and the biggest TV you’ve ever seen (running Netflix) included!  Don’t miss their PEN10 optional dinners too – it was one of the best meals we had in Cusco and not much more than USD3.

Activities:

Via Ferrata and Zipline

High above the Sacred Valley you’ll find the Skylodge Adventure Suites.  These infamous glass pods are attached to the cliff, providing brave guests with a chance to sleep under the stars in one of the most unique locations imaginable… unfortunately for us though, we weren’t the only ones that thought this sounded like a good idea – the pods were booked solid for months!

If, like us, you’re unable to spend an evening in the pod, there’s a great alternative available in the form of a day trip.  Geared up, you’ll climb over 400 metres, above the glass lodge and then zipline your way down through 6 different exciting lines; if you’re in reasonable shape it’s easily achievable (and the via ferrata can be substituted for a hike up should you prefer).

Humantay Lagoon Hike

A relatively easy hike, Humantay is one not to be missed!  For those not keen on the uphill hike, horses are available for a reasonable cost.

Rainbow Mountain Hike (Take One)

Before visiting, we’d heard a lot about the hike to Rainbow Mountain – some saying it was a must-see from Cusco whilst others said the colours are nothing like the over-saturated ones you’ll see floating around the city as touts try to book travellers on tours.

Keen to find out for ourselves (but not so keen to experience the altitude sickness we’d heard so much about) with initially joined the alternative trek which gets hikers much, much closer to the top of an alternative mountain in the same range.  Hikers here only have to walk for 45 minutes up (and 20 down) and have the space practically to themselves.

Unfortunately for us though, the mountains saw one of their first snows of the season which meant our private tour couldn’t even make it to the carpark, let alone to the infamous rainbow.  Instead, we spent the day checking out local historical sites and an awe-inspiring canyon.  Sure, it wasn’t what we went to see, but the canyon did go a way towards making up for that.

Would we recommend the alternative Rainbow Mountain trip?  As long as the weather is clear, absolutely!  At this point in time though, there is no way for tour providers to check the conditions up the top of the mountain – this means that some guests will find themselves on a long car ride (at a relatively high price compared with the original Rainbow Mountain) that results in a distinct lack of rainbow at the end of it all.

Rainbow Mountain (Take Two!)

Returning to Rainbow Mountain, but this time the original version, I had another crack at making it to the top and this time was successful!  With the help of a horse (for PEN60/USD18.20/NZD26) and a bit of trekking, I summited in time to soak in the incredible views.

Though some rave about Rainbow Mountain, the valley that it sits within really is just as incredible and well worth a visit.  Glaciers hang not far from the summit, the Red Valley peeks out from around the corner and, of course, the rainbow coloured mountainside takes pride of place.

Onwards travel to Arequipa:  Rejoining Peru Hop we travelled overnight, leaving Cusco late and arriving into Arequipa in the early hours.  Our Peru Hop tickets were organised ahead of time in a package so none of our travel with them had a standalone price.  If this is your first time in South America or you’re just looking for an extra touch of safety, comfort and convenience (sounds good, doesn’t it?), they’re the way to go.

Arequipa, Peru

With our plans to hike the Colca Canyon dashed thanks to a couple of head colds that we just couldn’t shake, for us, Arequipa became a place for some serious R&R.

The town itself is gorgeous and a significant departure from the hustle and bustle of Cusco so it ended up being a great place to spend some time.  They have plenty of pubs and little restaurants serving up great food at reasonable prices and some beautiful old architecture, so it’s definitely a spot that deserves more time than the quick connection some give it.

Accommodation:  3 nights in a six-bed mixed dorm at Flying Dog @ PEN26 each/night (USD7.80/NZD11.30)

Activities:  Known for it’s relative proximity to the Colca Canyon and for affordable and fun rafting, there’s plenty of reasons to stop for a few nights in the city – both to enjoy the outdoors and the lovely township of Arequipa.

Onwards travel to Huacachina, Ica:  Peru Hop once again.

Huacachina, Peru

A mega-touristy little town, built around South America’s only natural oasis, we didn’t really know what to expect upon our arrival.  We’d been warned off staying there over the weekend due to the all-consuming noise that emanates from a few of the bars so intentionally planned our stay to avoid Friday and Saturday night.  In doing so, we found Huazachina to be a surprisingly charming place to spend a night – yes it’s set up for tourists but sometimes there’s no harm in that.

Accommodation:  1 night in a 10-bed mixed dorm at the Wild Olive Guest House @ PEN29.65 each/night (USD9/NZD12.85).  A great hostel with comfortable beds, clean bathrooms, great showers and a massive Netflix-playing television – our favourite hostel in Peru.

Activites:  After relaxing around the oasis, we hit the desert for some serious dune bashing and sandboarding fun (booked through Peru Hop at PEN50/USD15/NZD21.45 each).

Onwards travel to Paracas (via Nazca):  Good ol’ Peru Hop to the rescue again – this was a long day on the bus but thankfully it was broken up with a few strategic stops (lunch with a view and a quick look at some of the Nazca Lines).

Lima, Peru

Though we’d heard people rave about many cities in South America, Lima isn’t often one of them… but it deserves to be!

Accommodation: 3 nights in a 6-bed mixed dorm at HosteLima  @ PEN23 each/night (USD7/NZD10).  The staff at the hostel were lovely but it had a slightly strange vibe about it when we were there – if returning to Lima, we’d likely look elsewhere (but the price was right so we wouldn’t rule a return out).

Activities:  We spend our days in Lima recharging our batteries after a serious of quick stops on our Peru Hop journey.  The city has some great shopping (and we were well due some new clothes after months of backpacking), vibrant communities, fabulous food and beautiful views.

Looking for more adventure?  We’d have loved to have gone paragliding off the clifftop but at USD80 for less than 10 minutes, we decided against it – if your budget allows, it looks like great fun!

Onwards travel to Huaraz:  Another overnight bus, this one on Cruz del Sue (booked through BusBud, 10.30pm departure) for PEN80 each (USD24.30/NZD34.70).  For once, all of the seats on the bus were salon cama and cheaper tickets were available for those that booked earlier, so if you see them online, be sure to snap them up!

Huaraz, Peru

A buzzing town, Huaraz’s streets really came to life in the evenings.  Huaraz itself isn’t much to write home about but it is home to some of the best hiking in Peru.

Accommodation:  3 nights in a private room at Hostel Akilpo @ PEN35 each/night (USD10.60/NZD15.20).  A super comfortable guest house but there was a fair bit of noise outside most nights (as I’d imagine there would be in many parts of Huaraz).

Activites – Hiking:

Churup

Totally unknown to us before our visit to Huaraz, Churup will forever go down in my memory as being home to some of the clearest water we’ve ever seen!

The hike itself starts with a reasonably steep ascent up a neverending set of steps before flattening out and then finishing in another climb.  The steeper parts of the track feature rubber covered ropes which can be used to hoist yourself up and though it would be a relatively easy hike (climbing aside) at sea level, it’s a bit more difficult at altitude.

Laguna 69

The hike that brings many travellers to the region really was one of the most beautiful day hikes we’ve ever seen.  Cascading waterfalls, impressive cliffs and an all-consuming valley, we couldn’t believe nobody had told us just how amazing the hike to the lagoon actually was!

Though the hike itself was longer than Churup, the include was much more steady.  Don’t let the lesser slope fool you though – it’s still a challenging trail due to the high altitude at which you’ll find it.

Onwards travel to Guayaquil, Ecuador:  Getting to Ecuador was quite the journey but catching buses saved us a lot of money.

  • Day bus from Huaraz to Trujillo with Linea.  PEN40 each (USD12.15/NZD17.35)
  • As we arrived into Trujillo in the afternoon and didn’t leave until close to midnight, we popped into the Ugarte Guest House between buses.  For PEN10 each (USD3/NZD4.35) we were able to store our bags, relax using their internet and have a shower before continuing our journey.
  • Night (and day!) bus from Trujillo, Peru to Guayaquil, Ecuador with Cruz del Sur.  PEN150 each (USD45.55/NZD65) for 18 and a half hours aboard.  The seats in salon cama were comfortable and included a basic breakfast and reasonable lunch.  Though it was a long journey, it was much more manageable than it might sound.

Guayaquil, Ecuador

The largest city in Ecuador and the gateway to the Galápagos, Guayaquil doesn’t exactly inspire visitors to the region.  Maybe we were just staying in the wrong part of town but based on our experience (and that of every other traveller we’ve spoken to that’s been to the city), we’d encourage you to skip on through as quickly as possible.

Accommodation:  1 night in a private room at Residencial Turistico Guayas @ USD11.20 (NZD16) each.

Onwards travel to San Cristobal (Galápagos Islands):  Flying Avianca, AV1636 @ USD207.58 each (NZD296.75).

The Galápagos Islands, Ecuador

The Galápagos, what can we even say?

A bucket list destination for many, it far exceeded our expectations to the point that I would easily call it my favourite travel experience to date – not just within South America but of anywhere I’ve been.

We sailed aboard the MV Origin for seven glorious nights and then enjoyed another two staying on San Cristobal.

Because of cruise fell in the middle of the monthly round-up, I’m not going to include all of the details here (as this post is already well overdue and an experience as amazing as this deserves our full attention) but in the meantime, here’s a sneak peek of the photos from our first day of cruising.

Lessons Learnt on the Road

  • Orange juice can be hard to find!  In cafes and restaurants you’ll likely find freshly squeezed fruit juice (and it is a treat) but it’s next to impossible to find in supermarkets and small stores – nectar instead is preferred in South America, and though it does the trick in a squeeze, it really doesn’t compare for us.
  • There’s a knack to sleeping on night buses… sleeping pills.  Initially, we tried not to take anything to help us sleep but after a few restless nights, we gave in a picked up some sleeping pills.  They’ve made all the difference and make these journeys much more manageable!  We’ve found availability to be significantly different between countries and even within them – in Peru, for example, we struggled to get anything other than herbal options in some pharmacies whilst others would supply us with medication normally only available with prescriptions.

As with all of our months on the road, there have been some real highlights but the highest of them all was, without doubt, our cruise through the Galápagos.

Stay tuned for more on that soon!

Check out our Recent Posts

Hiking Laguna Humantay – Cusco: More Than Machu Picchu

Amazon Planet: Your Ticket to the Peruvian Amazon

and one of my travel related musings – Oh, You Count Countries, Do You?

It’s been a quiet month on the blog as it’s been a busy month of travel – stay tuned for further updates!

Our Previous Months on the Road

A Month on the Road in South America – Chile and Argentina

Two Months on the Road in South America – Chile, Argentina & Brazil

Three Months on the Road in South America – Brazil, Bolivia, Chile & Peru

Accommodation Eco Tourism Peru Puerto Maldonado (Amazon Jungle) South America

Amazon Planet: Your Ticket to the Peruvian Amazon

November 26, 2017

The Amazon, without doubt, is a real bucket list destination for any nature lover.  With an ecosystem like no other, it’s one of the last true wilds in the world.

When we initially planned our visit to South America, we did so with a loose plan and a number of must-see spots in mind – Patagonia, Iguazu, Galapagos and of course the Amazon.

Did it live up to our expectations though?  We spent three nights at Amazon Planet putting them through their paces to find out.

Into the Wild – Activities Galore

With a range of programmes available to guests and a well-structured timetable, there’s plenty of time to make the most of your Amazon experience whilst still unwinding in this gorgeous jungle paradise.  Every morning an activity heads out whilst hammock-time is scheduled following lunch until the day cools down when a number of afternoon/evening activities come into play.

Books and board games are available throughout the day and happy hour does an excellent job of helping to form new friendships amongst fellow adventurers.

Let’s face it though – nobody’s in the Amazon with the main goal of playing cards, and good thing too – there’s plenty to do!

Upon arriving, we were introduced to Alejandro, our guide for the duration of our stay.  Throughout our time at Amazon Planet, he proved himself to be approachable, friendly and incredibly knowledgeable.  Alejandro had an incredible knack for recognising distant birdcall and barely noticable creepy-crawlies, bringing the jungle to life for us.

Jungle Walks, Day and Night

Throughout your stay at Amazon Planet you’ll be presented with many opportunities to head into the jungle – take them all!  With unique plants and incredible wildlife, you ever know what you’ll see whilst wandering the jungle.  The guides are exceptionally talented at identifying the vast variety of bird calls out in the jungle and easily spot the smallest of creatures, making every jungle walk a real chance to see new treasures.

When night falls, it’s time to grab your flashlight and go hunting for creepy crawlies!  Tarantulas, scorpions, frogs, caterpillars, snakes, lizards and more – there’s no shortage of beasties to catch your attention.

Alternatively, hop aboard the Amazon Planet boat on the hunt for caimans, the shy cousin of the alligator.  We were fortunate enough to spot a number of these small reptiles!

Generally, the animals we spotted in the wilds near Amazon Planet were smaller than we’d imagined – it’s not the place to find anacondas, for example, and though sloths are known to hang about in the region, they’re notoriously hard to spot.  Unfortunately, piranhas aren’t generally found in the fastmoving Madre de Dios River (but they can be spotted on the Tambopata programme!), nor are the pink river dolphins, but the few animals we didn’t see were soon forgotten in the buzz of excitement as we uncovered new ones.

And best of all, even if you don’t see much (though we promise, you will), Amazon Planet has a fantastic way of guaranteeing you’ll meet a bunch of local cuties – the Taricaya Ecological Reserve.

Taricaya Ecological Reserve

The only Amazon property in Peru to have their own ecological reserve, Amazon Planet really walk the talk when it comes to conversation.  Attracting biologists, vets and volunteers from the world over, they work together to ensure that local animals that are in need of some extra TLC are well looked after at Taricaya.

Not only do they release populations of native animals back into the wild, but they give those that are unable to reintroduced back into their habitats a fantastic life.

For visitors, it’s a real treat knowing that you’ll have the chance to see a variety of incredible animals, regardless of whether or not you spot them in the wild, but it’s even better knowing that some of the funds from your stay go towards running such a worthwhile operation.

Canopy Walk

Looking for an adrenaline rush (beyond tarantula spotting)?

Take to the skies, or the top of the Amazonian canopy to be exact, for a birdseye view of the surrounding rainforest – just remember to check your fear of heights at the door.

Nestled into the top of an ancient kapok tree, a 90-metre long suspension bridge stretches out to the viewing platform, 45 metres above the ground below.  The views out over the surrounding area are fantastic and being amongst the canopy really gives you a sense of the scale of the jungle.

Visit the Ese-Eja Tribe

A short ride upriver from Amazon Planet, lives Enrique, his wife and sometimes, his children.  Enrique and his wife span two very different generations – his father lived within the Amazon, completely immersed in a traditional, native way of life, whilst his children live during the week in the city, attending school in the hopes of joining the modern workforce as well-educated individuals.

We’ve attended a number of ‘community visits’ like this one now and, to be honest, some have been incredibly worthwhile and some have, quite simply, felt uncomfortable or inauthentic.  It’s fair to say that although we give these experiences a fair go, we are somewhat skeptical when approaching them – you just never know what you’re going to get and we certainly don’t like intruding where we’re not genuinely welcome.

That couldn’t have been further from the truth in this case though!

Enrique and his wife, despite the language barrier, did an amazing job of sharing their culture and customs with us, all with the biggest, most welcoming smiles.  Of course, we couldn’t communicate directly (as they spoke Quechuan) but a good giggle is universal as it turns out.

Over the course of the morning, we learnt how to make a bow and arrow (and eventually got better at shooting them), watched them start a fire using traditional methods, and learnt about their local foods, medicines and clothing – all of which comes directly from the rainforest.

Best of all, we left feeling connected to the local people, which is what an experience like this should be all about.

Boat Float

With the sun slowly disappearing over the horizon, where better to be in the Amazon than drifting gently downriver in the current?

The team at Amazon Planet organise for inflatable kayaks and boats to be taken upstream where guests jump in and spend put in some serious relaxation time.

Hunger Pangs – Food at Amazon Planet

Though you’ll be square in the middle of the jungle, the food at Amazon Planet is anything but rustic.  Banana pancakes and scrambled eggs for breakfast, fresh fish (caught locally) and delicious yuca fries for lunch and delicious steamed chicken and rice parcels for dinner.  Every meal is fresh, locally sourced, hearty and served in multiple courses.

As we near the end of our time in Peru, we can comfortably say it was amongst the best cuisine we’ve had during our time in the country!

It’s hard to go hungry out there but should you, additional snacks are available.  That’s not to mention the soft drinks and selection of beers and cocktails, all available at very reasonable prices.

A Place to Rest Your Head – Accommodation

With a busy day of jungle adventures behind you, a comfortable place to unwind is exactly what the doctor ordered.

Each bungalow at Amazon Planet is set back, away from the main dining quarters, along wooden boardwalks (perfect on those rainy Amazonian days).  The rooms are relatively basic but include high-quality mattresses, private bathrooms and a space to relax – ours had both a sofa and a little balcony with views out to the river.

Every day our room was cleaned and our water bottled topped up – a service that far exceeded our expectations in the middle of the jungle!

Transport: Getting to Puerto Maldonado from Cusco

Getting to Amazon Planet from Cusco is a relatively straightforward process and with the option of both buses and flights, there’s something to suit all budgets.

Overnight Buses

If you’re looking to save some money and have plenty of time on your hands, there is now a direct bus route servicing the region. Years ago it would have taken days to reach your final destination but now the journey runs a relatively comfortable 10 hours.

The route between Cusco and Puerto Maldonado is operated by Civa and Cruz Del Sur – both of which can be booked online through BusBud.  We rode with Excluciva (PEN50/USD15.40/NZD22/65 each) on the way there and Superciva (PEN40/USD12.35/NZD18.15 each) on the way back.  On both occasions, we booked the 1st floor (which is their salon cama offering – similar to business class on a flight) but found the Excluciva service to be far superior.  If you have the option to book on Excluciva, we’d definitely recommend spending the few extra dollars.

Flying

If you’d prefer to get to the Amazon via a more direct route then flying becomes your most efficient option.  A number of airlines offer fares to the Amazon, including StarPeru, Avianca, and LATAM, but we suggest you check SkyScanner to ensure you get the best price available.

Regardless of how you choose to arrive in Puerto Maldonado, Amazon Planet will organise someone to meet you at your point of arrival and for your transport to their offices on the outskirts of town.

Amazon Planet – Your Home in the Peruvian Amazon

Our stay in the Amazon was all about getting back to nature; to lay in bed with the sound of the evening jungle rains beating down, to explore the undergrowth, hunting out unique animals and simply soaking in the sights and sounds of one of the most incredible ecosystems in the world.

Amazon Planet offers all of the personal, homely touches that you’d hope for in the jungle but would never really expect.

Sure, the lodge isn’t the pinnacle of luxury, but it does exactly what it sets out to do – provide an amazing experience with caring, knowledgeable staff and many of the comforts of home.

The Amazon was on our South American bucket list, and for good reason, it’s retaining its spot there as a real once-in-a-lifetime experience.

Only, is it once-in-a-lifetime if you’d go back in a heartbeat?


Thank you to Amazon Planet for hosting our stay for the purpose of this review.  As always, all thoughts are our own.  We joined them for the 3 night ‘native’ programme which we highly recommend.

Travel

Oh, You Count Countries, Do You?

November 24, 2017

Like the ongoing debate as to whether you’re a traveller or a tourist, others also debate whether counting countries has value or is a shallow pursuit.

For those days do count countries, does stepping foot out of an airport count? Maybe spending a night?  Are you really seeing a country if you fly from point of point or does it take months of over-landing to really tick a place off? Will buses do the trick or is one required to hitchhike to really travel like a local?

What’s to be gained by keeping a record of how many countries you’ve been to?

I don’t know about you but I really couldn’t care less.

Some days on the road are incredibly hard work but I’m learning to wear them like a badge of honour.

Some days you argue, some you miss the bus. Sometimes the language barrier is just too great, others it feels impossible to get a good nights sleep – inconsiderate roommates, plasticwrapped  mattresses and noisey roads – take your pick.  Difficulties abound – nonexistent toilets, upset stomachs, scams, robberies.

Big or small, travel really can be challenging.

But ‭often in retrospect, the difficulties become one of the best things about the journey; it’s all about learning.  Sometimes when things go wrong it ends up with a result that’s unexpectedly right.

Patience, resilience, empathy, kindness and respect – all values you’d be hard-pressed not to deepen over an extended period of travel.

Regardless of how long you travel for or how you choose to do so, there are opportunities everywhere for self-improvement; to better understand how others live and to grow in the process.

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.

– Mark Twain, The Innocents Abroad/Roughing It

Does keeping a record of the number of countries visited have any impact on this potential for personal growth?  Does the process of counting countries (or not) matter in the big scheme of things?  Does the manner in which we choose to travel make a difference?

Of course not.

Some opt for all-inclusive trips, in which they never step foot outside of the resort, but for the shuttle that brings them to and from the airport, whilst others trapse around far-flung countries on the tightest of budgets. Some immerse themselves in a new language, culture and food whilst others prefer visiting countries that feel a little more like home.

Do we have any right to judge?  What’s a walk in the park for one might be a massive step out of another’s comfort zone.

Do I count countries?  You bet.

Am I afraid to revisit somewhere I’ve been at the expense of adding to my count?  Never.

We travel for the love of it – for the places, the food, the people, the experience (and sometimes, yes, the shopping).

Life’s too short to worry about what other people think.

Whether you choose to travel fast or slow, whether you count countries or not – you do you and have a fabulous time in the process.

Because at the end of the day, what should it matter to anyone else?

If you would like to track your travels, we love Been!


Whether you agree or disagree, pin this post to get the conversation going…

Do real travelers count countries? How long do you need to be in a place for it to count? How many cities? What even makes a real traveler a real traveler? Do real travelers count countries? Join us as we debate both sides of the argument - where do you stand on it?

Photo Supplied: Flickr

Activities Cusco Hiking Peru South America

Hiking Laguna Humantay – Cusco: More Than Machu Picchu

November 23, 2017

Cusco is known across the world as the gateway to Machu Picchu, the most iconic of all the Inca sites.  With so much to see in this region, those skipping through whilst only visiting the Lost City of the Incas are only tapping the surface of what’s on offer.  

Join us as we explore many of the day trips that Cusco has on offer and prepare to extend your time in this amazing city! 

First up, Laguna Humantay (also known as the Humantay Lagoon).

Nestled into Humantay Mountain, under towering mountain peaks and hanging glaciers, sits Laguna Humantay – one of the most incredible bodies of water we’ve ever seen.  Unbelievable hues of bright blue and green shimmer in water that feels somewhat out of place sitting atop a mountain.  This otherworldly sight

It’s little wonder that centuries ago, the ancient Inca’s believed this to be a sacred place – even now, with tourists gathered around, you can still feel the magic.

What to Expect on the Hike to the Humantay Lagoon

I have a real love-hate relationship with hiking.  When it’s flat or sloping gently downhill, I love it.  When I’m clamping up steep, unending tracks – well, I don’t need to tell you how I feel about it.  I’m not the fittest person around and I really do find it a challenge.

Without a doubt though, the views at the top of Humantay are worth the relatively short slog up to the top.

Leaving the mini-van at Soraypampa (3,900 metres above sea level), the hike begins, varying from a gentle slope to fairly demanding until trekkers come across the lagoon at 4,200 metres above sea level.

As you hike, you’ll enjoy views out over the surrounding valley and Salkantay, the namesake mountain of the popular multi-day hike in the region, headed for Machu Picchu.  The area itself is gorgeous which certainly makes the hike all the more manageable.

The altitude and elevation gain is enough that hiking is more challenging than at sea level but if you take it slowly and stop for breathers along the way, it really won’t feel any more difficult than any other uphill hike you’ve done.

As always, after a couple of breaks and a good chance to catch your breath at the top, any suffering is soon forgotten!

Top Tip:  Should you require (or just prefer) assistance to get to the top, horses are available and as a local leads you up, you don’t need any riding experience.  The horses in all of Peru were in great condition, the service is reasonably priced and you can decide when you arrive (both at the base of the trail, and part way up), making this a great way to get to Laguna Humantay should you need a hand.

Practical Details Relating to Your Laguna Humantay Hike:

  • Pick up is offered if your accommodation is relatively close to Plaza de Armas.  We were amongst the first to be collected at 4.45am from Magic Packers (a hostel we highly recommend).
  • The total drive is approximately 2.5 hours in each direction – this is broken up with breaks for meals.
  • Both breakfast and lunch are included for participants in Mollepata.  Breakfast included bread, fruit, fresh eggs and tea/coffee/juice whilst lunch was a delicious buffet.
  • Take plenty of water as there’s nowhere to refill bottles or purchase new ones once you start the hike.  Drinks are available for purchase where you stop for breakfast though and also at the base of the trail; they’re surprisingly affordable so don’t race out to stock up the night before if you’re short on time.
  • A hiking stick is offered to each participant but as we had our own hiking poles from our Patagonian hikes, I used those.  Nathan decided not to use either and was absolutely fine.
  • Drop off is to a central plaza, not far from Plaza de Armas – your guide will point you back in the direction of your accommodation or help you hail a taxi if required.  Cabs in Cusco are affordable and generally reliable so getting around is easily done.  Uber is also freely available should you prefer.
  • When you book through Exploor your voucher is issued and you have five months to decide when you’d like to book your hike in, making it the perfect way for friends and family to gift you an amazing experience (rather than more stuff that you don’t need).  At only USD45 including breakfast, lunch, transport and guide, this is amazing value too!  You’ll just need to allow PEN10 (USD3/NZD4.50) each for entrance to the community.

If there’s one day hike you do from Cusco, we highly recommend you make it Humantay.

Bang-for-buck, no other hike has ever compared to the beauty of this track and with the addition of horses, it really is attainable for the vast majority of travellers.

The views speak for themselves and if the water looks like this on an overcast, gloomy day, imagine them on a beautiful clear-sky day…


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An easy day trip from Cusco, Peru, Humantay Lagoon is easily the best short hike in the region. The stunning blue green lagoon becons hikers after approximately an hour of walking uphill and the valley throughout rewards with incredible views. Definitely one to include in your Machu Picchu itinerary (or if you're doing the Salkantay Trek you'll have the pleasure anyway)!An easy day trip from Cusco, Peru, Humantay Lagoon is easily the best short hike in the region. The stunning blue green lagoon becons hikers after approximately an hour of walking uphill and the valley throughout rewards with incredible views. Definitely one to include in your Machu Picchu itinerary (or if you're doing the Salkantay Trek you'll have the pleasure anyway)!

Thank you to Exploor for hosting us for the purpose of this review.  All views, as always, are entirely our own.  We highly recommend you book your trip to Humantay Lagoon through Exploor.

Bolivia Brazil Chile Itineraries Monthly Round-Up Peru South America

Three Months on the Road in South America – Brazil, Bolivia, Chile & Peru

November 13, 2017

Another month in South America is behind us and for the life of me, I don’t know where the time’s going!

As we have in previous months, this post is designed to give you a summary of our recent adventures and help those of you considering a similar trip plan your route and budget.

We’re a bit late on getting this month out so let’s not mess around – here goes!

If this is the first monthly round-up you’ve read, you may like to check out itinerary and costings for the first and second month we spend in South America first.

Ilha Grande, Brazil

Not much more than a stone’s throw from Rio, Ilha Grande is an island lying just off the coast.  Boasting gorgeous beaches (though due to the lack of beautiful sunshine, we didn’t manage to see them at their best), it’s a great option for some R&R.

Accommodation:  3 nights in a 6-bed dorm at Hostel Refugio @ BLR45 each/night (USD13.70/NZD19.80).  A good hostel with a substantial breakfast included.  A little walk out of town but as the centre is so small, it really isn’t far from the action.

Activities:  We booked a day trip island hopping out to Paradise Island and back along Ilha Grande through Equipe Athos (and were put on a boat with Tubarão Tour).  We were promised snorkeling gear and when it was withheld from us and we were instead greeted by a fairly aggressive skipper, it’s fair to say the day soured.  Most of the spots we visited were over crowed and as snorkeling was the main aim of our day, it’s fair to say it was a pretty big disappointment – at least we had our friends with us to make the day a good one!

Onwards travel to Paraty:  We booked a private transfer for BRL50 each (USD15.35/NZD22.10) whilst on the boat heading over to Ilha Grande (with Easy Transfer).  In retrospect, we could have arranged our own transfer ourselves but with absolutely no Portuguese and limited time, we were happy with our decision.

Paraty, Brazil

Our own private paradise, we stayed just out of the colonial centre of Paraty in a secluded bay, accessible only by boat.

Though we visited both Ilha Grande and Paraty, in our opinion one would generally be sufficient.  We personally liked the laidback nature of Paraty and would pick it as our preference between the two spots.

Accommodation:  2 nights in a private room at Happy Hammock Eco Guesthouse (dorms are also available).  Transfers in and out of the guesthouse are organised by Patrick and the team – contact them for further details.  Happy Hammock was a real highlight of our time in Brazil!

Activities:  From the guesthouse, we popped out on a number of free excursions – a hike to the neighbouring beach for lunch, swimming, snorkeling at night with bioluminescent plankton (wow!) and a day trip to the historical centre of Paraty.  Not to mention all that hammock time!

Onwards travel to La Paz:  Public night bus from Paraty to Sao Paulo on Reunidas Paulista (BRL92.60/USD28.25/NZD40.80 each) and then a flight from Sao Paulo to La Paz on Boliviana de Aviacion (BRL821/USD250.45/NZD361.85 each).

La Paz, Bolivia

We’d heard mixed things about La Paz – it seems it’s a place people love or hate.

Fortunately, we loved it!  It’s a little grimy and a little mad but it’s got a whole lot of character and a neat buzz about it.

Accommodation:  3 nights at House Wonderful @ BOB60 (USD8.30/NZD12) each/night.  The reviews online for this hostel were fantastic but unfortunately, reality didn’t match for us – when we returned to La Paz we found a different (and much better) place to stay so couldn’t really recommend a stay at Hostel Wonderful.

Activities:

Death Road Biking

The main reason for our visit to La Paz, the Death Road did not disappoint!  Hurtling down what used to be the most dangerous road in the world is not for the faint of heart but those that give it a go are rewarded with a tremendous sense of achievement.  We’re yet to meet anyone who’s done it and didn’t love it!  We rode with Barracuda and unreservedly recommend them.  BOB570 each (USD82.50/NZD119.15).

Red Cap Walking Tour

Walking tours can be a great way to help find your feet in a new city and with Bolivia’s intriguing political history, we decided to explore the city with the help of a local.  Red Cap are professional and affordable and do a great job of showing off the diversity of this unique city.  BOB20 each (USD3/NZD4.30) plus a tip (and please do remember to tip, otherwise the guides don’t get paid).

Onwards travel to Uyuni:  We’d heard horror stories about the night buses down the line so jumped at the opportunity to pick up reasonably priced flights.  Boliviana de Aviación (BOA) @ BOB536 each (USD77.55/NZD112).

Uyuni (& the Salt Flats), Bolivia

The jumping-off point to the world-renowned Bolivian Salt Flats, Uyuni doesn’t offer a great deal to travellers but its surrounding area certainly does.  Let me put it this way, nobody ventures down to Uyuni for the town itself.

Accommodation:  1 night in a triple room at La Rocka @ BOB50 each/night (USD7.20/NZD10.40).  The rooms here were comfortable but the toilets weren’t kept particularly clean – more a reflection of the few other guests staying there but not very pleasant all the same.  For the price though, we were happy enough.

Activites:  We booked a 3-night/4-day tour of the Salt Flats with Jukil de los Andes and were very happy with our decision. The addition of an additional night (most people seem to book 2n/3d) meant we got a lot more time on the Salt Flats and our volcano climb provided us with the most amazing views out over the flats.  Salt flats, train graveyards, cactus islands, volcanoes, lagoons, flamingos galore and more – these tours are diverse and so, so much fun.

Onwards travel to San Pedro:  The tour dropped us at the border between Bolivia and Chile and included a mini-van transfer into the city at no additional charge.

Arica, Chile

A quick stop on our way further north, Arica is a lovely seaside city.  Their weather is nice, the people are friendly and though we didn’t spend much time exploring, we did get a good feeling from the town.

Accommodation: 1 nights in a private room at Residencial Tres Soles @ ARS202.50 each/night (USD11.60/NZD16.40)

Onwards travel to La Paz:  Local bus @ CLP8,000 each (USD12.65/NZD18.25) including a delicious lunch – the first proper lunch we’ve been served on a bus (and still, the only one to date!)

La Paz, Bolivia

Our second visit to La Paz, this time we weren’t there to tick off activities but to recharge our batteries and soak up the city.  Our newfound hostel was a big improvement on the last one so we’d definitely recommend staying there.

Accommodation:  2 nights at Landscape – International B&B in a private double room @ BOB67.37 each/night (USD9.75/NZD14)

Activites:  We caught the red cablecar up to the El Alto markets (BOB3 per person/per ride) and though it was a way to fill the time, it really didn’t compare to the Chichi Markets in Guatemala.  The markets are worth a visit if you’ve got time on your hands but, to be honest, we preferred the tourist markets in the middle of town… that is unless you’re in the market for car parts, badly-made knock-off clothing and general household supplies!

Onwards travel to CopacabanaBolivia Hop.  This is a great service provided for travellers – for a set price, they’ll generally pick you up from your accommodation and will drop you at your next home-away-from-home.  We picked up the full pass which includes our transport all the way from La Paz, Bolivia through to Lima, Peru (with the exception of one side trip up to the Amazon).

Copacabana, Bolivia

A cute little lakeside town, Copacabana doesn’t offer a heck of a lot more than relaxation but it does it well.  It’s a nice place to spend a night or two and due to its size, it’s super easy to get around by foot.

Accommodation:  1 night in a private room at Hostal 6 de Agosto @ BRL40 each/night (USD5.75/NZD8.30).  Basic accommodation but good value for the price – we had a private bathroom with warm(ish) water and relatively comfortable beds – be sure to take singles for everyone in your group though as the double beds weren’t as good.

ActivitesAfternoon trip to Isla del Sol.  We caught the Bolivia Hop ferry over to what was known as the birthplace of the sun during Inca times.  The island itself was beautiful but the one hike from our dropoff point to that of collection was relatively quick – if you’re interested in seeing the island properly, we’d probably suggest spending a night there.  BOB70 (USD10.15/NZD14.65)

Onwards travel to Puno:  Bolivia Hop – they collected us from the big white anchor statue on the lakefront.

Puno, Peru

Puno was so much bigger than we’d expected!  It’s not a particularly memorable city but did have a busy main street serving up reasonable food (a ‘tourist menu’ will get you three courses for approximately PEN20 (USD6.15/NZD8.90) and it serves its purpose well, acting as the jumping off point to the floating islands.

Accommodation:  1 night in a private room at Suite Independencia @ PEN30 each/night (USD9.25/NZD13.35).  This was a special price availed through our Bolivia Hop passes.

ActivitesAfternoon visit to Uros.  Here we visited locals living as they have for generations (more or less) on floating islands made of reeds.  I’m not entirely sure what I made of the experience to be honest – although the islands themselves were intriguing and we snapped some lovely photos we did feel very much like we were only welcome on the island if we spent up large.  As with any experience like this, I would have much more interest in interacting with the locals than simply being seen as an ATM.  Would I recommend others to visit?  Probably, as I do think I’d have been disappointed if I’d not experienced the community for myself, but I’m not 100% sold on the experience.  We’ll let you make up your own mind.  PEN35 each (USD10.80/NZD15.60).

Onwards travel to Cusco:  Good ol’ Bolivia Hop, by way of an overnight bus.  Once we arrived into Cusco, they organised taxis to take us to our individual hostels.

Cusco, Peru

The cultural capital of Peru, Cusco offers travellers so much – delicious food, unique cultural sites, unbeatable trekking and lots of adventure – it’s hard to tear yourself away!

Accommodation:  2 nights in a private room at Magic Cusco Hostel, followed by a break to visit Machu Picchu and another night upon our return.  PEN20 each/night (USD6.15/NZD8.90).  I returned from Machu Picchu unwell and Esperanza very kindly let me sleep throughout the day at no extra charge.  She doesn’t speak a great deal of English but was very patient with us and incredibly kind.  Though the hostel’s a little way out of town, Uber is cheap and it’s worth staying out of the city to experience her hospitality (and to get a real duvet – oh my goodness!)

Activities:

Machu Picchu

Though there are plenty of reasons to visit Cusco, Machu Picchu really is the grand-daddy of them all.  This incredible site reveals more and more of its secrets each year but so much is still unknown.

There are numerous ways of getting to this historic site, from a comfy train to challenging, multi-day treks.  We opted for something in the middle – what we would consider the most exciting way to get to Machu Picchu – the Inca Jungle Trek.

We booked through Peru Andean Hop where our fee of USD240 each (PEN778/NZD348.45) included mountain biking, rafting, ziplining, accommodation for three nights, guides, food, transfers, entrance to Machu Picchu (along with a guided tour of the site) and the train back.

After biking, rafting, zip-lining and hiking our way to Machu Picchu (part of it along the original Inca Trail) we opted to catch the bus up to Machu Picchu (lining up from 3.30am – ouch!) for USD12 each.  It was a fairly costly bus ride but considering we arrived at the top feeling fresh and in time to make our 6.10am tour, it was well worth it.  At the end of our visit, we hiked our way back down the steps and our choice was totally reaffirmed – there’s no way I would have made it up all those steps at 5am!

With a new timing system recently introduced, we picked up some helpful tips (and almost came undone in the process) – stay tuned for our Machu Picchu post where we’ll fill you in on everything you need to know.

Onwards travel to Puerto Maldonado (the Amazon):  After returning to Cusco and spending a night recuperating, we caught a night bus (the best salon cama we’ve experienced so far!) with Excluciva @ PEN50 each (USD15.40/NZD22.25).

Lessons Learnt on the Road

  • Toilet paper is not a given.  We’ve found hostels and guesthouses in the cities supply toilet paper but as soon as you get out of a city, it’s not guaranteed.  We’ve always travelled with a little toilet paper as a backup but here it is sometimes an absolute necessity.
  • Hot showers in Bolivia aren’t always so hot.  Most showers in Bolivia employ a little electric water heater right on the shower-head.  Aside from the risk of electrocution, they’re unreliable at the best of times.
  • You do get used to putting your toilet paper in the bin!  I didn’t think it would happen, but it kind of has.
  • Bouncing around different currencies is difficult.  Even as I write this, I find it hard to convert between Soles and Bolivianos – thank goodness for XE.
  • We can afford to eat out again!  Bolivia and Peru are both significantly cheaper than our original destinations (Chile, Argentina and Brazil) so we can finally afford to eat out.  A good sized meal can cost as little as PEN8-12 each (USD2.45-3.70) if you look in the right places and even less in Bolivia.  We had initially planned on cooking for ourselves sometimes but we’ve actually found it really difficult to source fresh meat here so it’s not happening at this stage.

I remember when Machu Picchu felt like a distant thought on our Latin American journey so to not only have visited but to have it behind us now feels totally surreal.  We have lots more excitement on the horizon though with some more amazing hikes in Peru lined up and the most amazing cruise through the Galapagos.

Sometimes it’s hard not to pinch ourselves!

Check out our Recent Posts

EcoCamp Patagonia – Reviewing Torres del Paine’s Bucket-List Glamping

Pedra de Gavea – Just How Difficult Is Rio’s Highest Hike?

Salar de Uyuni Tour, Day 1 – So Much More than a Salt Flat

The Complete Guide to Paraty, Brazil – Paradise is Only a Bus Ride from Rio!

Our Previous Months on the Road

A Month on the Road in South America – Chile and Argentina

Two Months on the Road in South America – Chile, Argentina & Brazil


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Your guide to South America - Brazil, Bolivia, Chile & Peru.  Accommodation, transport, activities and costings for everything from Machu Picchu to the Death Road.  The Salt Flats to the beaches of Brazil. Your guide to South America - Brazil, Bolivia, Chile & Peru.  Accommodation, transport, activities and costings for everything from Machu Picchu to the Death Road.  The Salt Flats to the beaches of Brazil.


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Accommodation Chile Luxury Patagonia Reviews South America

EcoCamp Patagonia – Reviewing Torres del Paine’s Bucket-List Glamping

October 30, 2017

With the Towers piercing the dawning sky and the wild Patagonian winds swirling around, there’s no better place to be curled up in Torres del Paine than at EcoCamp.  Recently we had the pleasure of staying at this incredible property in an equally incredible part of the world.  Having read countless reviews online it was hard to imagine anywhere could live up to such exceptionally high expectations.

But it did.

Prime Position

Sitting atop a plateau, not too far from the start of the infamous W-Trek, guests to EcoCamp Patagonia find themselves in prime position to see the comings and goings of the park. 

First thing in the morning, the Towers, bathed in orange can be seen from the boardwalks around camp whilst those with eagle eyes might spot a puma in the nearby hills (it happened on our first morning so keep your eyes peeled!) 

By staying in the park, you’ll be treated to the very best of nature without giving up any of your home comforts.

EcoCamp’s Philosophy – Eco Through and Through

Not only was EcoCamp Patagonia the first fully sustainable accommodation provider south of the Amazon but they were also the first geodesic property in the world.

Leading the way in luxury and customer experience, they’ve also managed to prioritise environmentally friendly practises, something that is clear throughout the glampsite.

Though EcoCamp is the proud owner of countless awards (National Geographic Best Outfitter, TripAdvisor Greenleaders Platinum Level, Chile’s Most Sustainable Tourism Company and many more), as guests visiting the site, it’s clear that their sustainable practises extend far beyond awards and paperwork.

Composting toilets are used throughout the camp (to the untrained eye, they look and operate just like a normal toilet), lush-smelling biodegradable shower products are provided, reusable water bottles are available on-loan to avoid the use of single-use ones and energy efficient wood-burning fireplaces are used to warm up the domes.  The camp itself is powered by solar, wind and micro-hydro turbines whilst propaine gas is used to warm water for guests and though there’s no shortage of power, all guests are encouraged to minimise their impact on the local environment.

Activities to Suit Everyone

Each evening, guests come together in the community dome where a cocktail and delicious antipasto platters are served up as the following days’ activities are introduced.

In our excitement, we’d already planned out the activities we wanted to do during our stay (as a part of the ‘Patagonia Wildlife Tour‘) but plenty of information is given to help those who are unsure make an informed decision.

Generally, there are three options offered up – two that are considered challenging (they are after all based in a mountainous national park famous for its extreme hiking) and one that’s relatively low-key (great for the day after that big trek).

Alternatively, EcoCampers are able to relax in their domes, enjoying the scenery around the campsite (and that heavenly bed) but with the national park calling out, the temptation to get amongst the activities, for us, was too great to ignore.

Day One

Keen to rest our tired bodies after completing most of the W-Trek, we enthusiastically signed up for the Grey Glacier navigation.  On a clear day, this includes a boat trip right up to the glacier but unfortunately, with typically Patagonian weather, our navigation wasn’t able to go ahead.  Instead, we stopped at a number of viewpoints on our way to the glacial lake and keenly spotted icebergs as they inched closer to land.

It was the perfect way to spend the day before taking on the mammoth trek that brought us to Torres del Paine in the first place.

Day Two

The highlight of our visit to Patagonia, day two saw us take on the challenge of the towers – the jewel in Torres del Paine’s crown.  It was difficult.  It was amazing.  It was an absolute once-in-a-lifetime experience and definitely one for your adventure bucket-list.

To learn more about our experience, be sure to read our review of the hike to the Base of the Towers.

Time to Relax

Once your activities are done, there’s plenty of space to unwind with your new-found friends (there’s nothing like undertaking a challenging hike to bring a group together!) in the community domes and in the peak season, yoga is even offered to help relax tired muscles and rejuvenate the soul.

There are plenty of times we’ve travelled in the past when we’ve come back more tired than we started.  EcoCamp provides the perfect balance of adventure and relaxation though, ensuring that all guests come away fulfilled and recharged – if only we could be as dedicated to looking after ourselves in our everyday lives!

Inside the Domes

With a range of accommodation options, glamping here manages to be absolute bucket-list material whilst still being within reach for your average traveller.  From the attainable standard domes (where shared board is available for singles) to the luxurious suite domes, all guests get to enjoy the camp’s incredible hospitality, food and activities, at a price point to suit.

During our stay, we had the pleasure of staying in one of EcoCamp’s premium suite domes.  I’ll never forget walking in the door and seeing our new little home-away-from-home for the first time; with geodesic patterns lining the ceiling, an expansive (and incredibly comfortable) bed taking pride of place in the room and the fireplace roaring away in anticipation of the chilly night to come, it was incredibly clear that we were in for a treat.

Our dome was equipped with a fully functioning bathroom – complete with the most glorious, piping hot, rain shower – exactly the ticket after a long day out on the trails.

The EcoCamp Patagonia Team

The staff at EcoCamp are the best of the best.  From the guides that personally learn each of your names to the waitresses that enthusiastically exchange travel stories over dinner, the team in Torres del Paine instantly make their guests feel at home, as if part of one big, happy extended family.

Nothing was ever a problem and even in the depths of the national park, we experienced service on-par with (if not surpassing) all of the five-star properties we’ve stayed at in the past.

It’s funny as when we checked in, we were told that EcoCamp was almost an ‘anti-hotel’ but with care and attention like we were all shown, they’re certainly holding their own against the big boys of the industry.

World Class Cusine

The food on offer at EcoCamp is top notch – there’s no other way to put it.  With fully trained chefs personalising menus and a creative barman knocking up delicious concoctions, there was never a shortage of incredible treats to enjoy.

Each morning, as guests munch on a fabulous breakfast spread, they decide upon their evening menu.  With options like the following, making a decision is easier said than done!

  • King crab cannelloni with a king crab sauce
  • Pork sirloin with a honey and mustard sauce and Dauphinoise potatoes
  • Chicken supreme wrapped in bacon and stuffed with tomato, cheese and basil, served with quinoa and vegetables

It’s hard to believe meals like these are available in the depths of a national park!

Lunches are just as gourmet with a selection of breads, meats, cheeses and salads on offer, ensuring that guests are well fueled throughout a busy day of activities.  From quinoa salad filled with roasted vegetables and fresh chicken breast to mozzarella, ham and smashed avocado rolls, everyone is free to make exactly what they want, and trust me, you’ll want to make it all.  Throw in a brownie, muffin, dried and fresh fruit and a selection of nuts and you’ll start thinking that lunch might just be the highlight of your day out!

As delicious as EcoCamp’s food is though, you’d be wrong – nothing beats a day out in the national park.

EcoCamp Patagonia – The Epitome of Bucket-List Travel

There are some experiences that stay with you long after you leave and, for us, both our hike to the Base of the Towers and our stay at EcoCamp, fit squarely into this category.

We were amazed by the level of care and detail that both the staff and facilities offered and genuinely couldn’t fault a thing.

Get your pen out team – without a doubt, it’s time to update your travel wish-list!


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Torres del Paine Glamping at EcoCamp - bucket list accommodation in Patagonia.  Read our review to find out just why this is the one anti-hotel that you HAVE to visit. Torres del Paine Glamping at EcoCamp - bucket list accommodation in Patagonia.  Read our review to find out just why this is the one anti-hotel that you HAVE to visit.

Thank you to the team at EcoCamp for so kindly hosting us.  We had the most incredible time but as always, all thoughts are our own.

Eco Tourism Falkland Islands South America

The Best of the Falkland Islands – A Guide to the Outer Islands

October 29, 2017

The Falkland Islands are home to some of the rarest beauty in the world. This Southern archipelago, also known simply as the Falklands, is made up of over 700 islands in total, most of which remain untouched by human presence. However, the few that are inhabited welcome visitors with open arms.  There, you’ll find locals that are keen to share their hidden gem in the Southern Atlantic Ocean with those that make the journey.

So where should you go if you want to discover the magic of the Falkland Islands for yourself?

After an amazing holiday in the Islas Malvinas earlier this year, there’s one thing I can say for sure – no two islands are the same.

Here are my Falkland Island recommendations  – get ready to plan your itinerary!

Which Islands Should I Visit on the Falklands?

With so many islands to discover, it makes sense to explore beyond the two major settlements on East & West Falkland. But before you plan your holiday, there are a few things to take into account. Firstly, only around seven of the outer islands offer accommodation for visitors. Others are accessible only by cruise ship or day trips on a boat. Secondly, every island offers a unique experience. If time is limited, or you want to focus on a specific interest during your holiday (birding, hiking etc) it’s important to know which islands are best suited to your desires.

Weddell Island

At 63,000 acres, Weddell Island is the largest of the Falkland’s outer islands. The undulating hills and shrub-covered plains play host to a diverse wildlife, including a few interesting introduced species! Weddell Island is home to a small herd of reindeer and is one of the few islands with a resident population of Patagonian grey foxes.

Like most of the islands, penguins can also be found frolicking around the shorelines. Gentoo penguin colonies are a common sight and Magellanic penguins dig burrows in the soft peaty earth. Marine mammals are also at home on Weddell, with sea lions resting underneath the tussock, while dolphins play in the bays.

Best For:

Birding. Despite the debatable threat the foxes pose, bird life thrives on Weddell Island. I was on the island for a little more than 24 hours and still managed to lay my eyes on 25 different species! In recent years, a whopping 54 species of birds have been spotted by the island’s only permanent residents, Jane & Martin.

Where to Stay:

The Weddell Island Lodge offers two comfortable self-contained apartments for visitors to relax in. And your hosts Jane & Martin will make sure your stay on Weddell is a memorable one!

What to Do:

Brandish a pair of binoculars for some of the best bird watching in the world. Wander the countryside in search of a roaming reindeer. Spot sea lion pups among the shallows. And climb Mt Weddell for 360-degree views of the island.

Pebble Island

Pebble Island offers a bucolic contrast between sandy beaches, rocky mountain ranges, grassy plains and shallow wetlands. It’s also where you can find the semi-precious stones the island took its name from. The island is rife with more than 40 species of bird life – officially marking it as an important bird area. Here you’ll find Gentoo, Rockhopper, Macaroni & Magellanic penguins, as well as the imperial cormorant, waterfowl and black-necked swans.

These days, Pebble Island is home to a small farming community. But the tranquil landscape defies its turbulent past. Pebble Island played a starring role in the Falklands War when Argentinian forces established a small airbase on the island that was subsequently raided by SAS troopers on the 14th May 1982.

Best For:

War History. Driving around Pebble Island, you can still find relics from the war lying undisturbed on the ground. The jagged remains of an Argentinean Dagger C-437 look ominous against the agrarian landscape, while memorials to both Argentine and British lives lost pepper the land.

Where to Stay:

Pebble Lodge is the homely, comfortable accommodation on Pebble Island. The lodge is run by a Falklands local, Riki, who doubles as your tour driver. Make sure you stay long enough to enjoy the amazing food his resident chef prepares for guests of the lodge.

What to Do:

Hunt for the iconic spherical pebbles on the islands’ western beaches. Watch rockhoppers expertly climb the steep cliff faces. Hear the cacophony caused by the large Gentoo colonies. Visit Elephant Beach – the longest beach in the Falklands!

Sea Lion Island

Sea Lion Island is probably the most popular island for visitors to the Falkland Islands (outside of East Falkland). At just over 5 miles long and a smidge more than a mile wide, it is an excellent place to explore by foot. And it packs a huge punch in its petite frame! One of the only islands without any livestock farming, and completely free of predators, it’s a true sanctuary for wildlife.

Three species of penguins and countless other birds inhabit sea lion island. Seals and sea lions line the shores, and if you’re lucky, you’ll be able to spot the orcas known to swim offshore preying on young seal pups.

Best For:

Spotting elephant seals. Sea Lion Island is home to the Falkland’s largest elephant seal breeding site. The best time to visit is around the third week of October – the peak of the breeding season – when up to 1800 seals can be found on the beaches.

Where to Stay:

On Sea Lion Island, stay at the strategically positioned Sea Lion Lodge where you have fantastic views from every window! One of the Falkland Island’s premier lodges, it’s well placed for accommodating larger groups of visitors.

What to Do:

Walk the entire perimeter of the island. Watch elephant seals battling for mating privileges on the beach. Go whale watching without having to leave the shore. Relax with a drink in the lodge’s lounge while watching penguins from the comfort of your couch!

Carcass Island

Ask any local which is their favourite of the Falkland’s outer islands and you’ll often hear the same name, Carcass Island. Whether this is for the stunning scenery, because it’s one of the few islands with trees, or because the lodge’s chef makes the most amazing morning tea spread, I could never be sure!

Despite the rather grim sounding name, the island was actually named after the HMS Carcass – a vessel that surveyed the island in 1766. Carcass Island is a popular cruise port and true nature lover’s paradise. Teeming with wildlife, it’s home to a rich array of bird life including Gentoo and Magellanic penguins, and the infamous cheeky caracara. Elephant seals can also be found at the aptly named ‘Elephant Flats’.

Best For:

Walking. Although there are no official trails, Carcass Island is a fantastic place to hike around. Suitable for all levels, the rolling landscape is easy enough to traverse while offering spectacular views over Byron Sound and beyond.

Where to Stay:

On Carcass Island, you can stay at the McGill’s lodge accommodation. The newly refurbished rooms are spacious and comfortable. And you won’t want to leave after sampling the famous smoko!

What to Do:

Climb up to the rock sculptures on ram paddock hill. Watch penguins surfing in the shallow waters of Dyke Bay. Stay a little longer and take a day trip to West Point Island to see its resident black-browed albatross colony.


How To Get Around the Falkland Islands

Transport to the outer islands from East Falkland, and between the islands of the Falklands is made easy with the local government air service, FIGAS.

FIGAS operate on demand and their fleet of small passenger planes make for an enjoyable, unique and convenient way to explore the islands.

Falkland Island Tourism – Are the Islands Worth Seeing?

With so many great islands to explore in the Falklands, there’s no doubt that you’ll have an unforgettable experience wherever you go.

So, whether you’re visiting the Falkland Islands for their remarkable scenery, unique and diverse bird life, to remember those fallen in the war, or to hike the amazing coastlines (or all of the above) you’ll find what you’re looking for, and more!


Thank you to Blogilicious and the Falkland Islands Tourist Board for making Nadine’s visit to the islands possible.  As always, all thoughts are our own.

Adventure Brazil Rio de Janeiro South America

Pedra de Gavea – Just How Difficult Is Rio’s Highest Hike?

October 26, 2017

Just how challenging is the hike to the summit of Pedra de Gavea? On a humid summers day in Rio de Janeiro, we found out firsthand.

By now you’d think we were slowly adjusting to all the hiking – we’ve certainly done our fair share of challenging walks in South America. Between making it through the majority of the W-Trek and up the Fitz Roy, our hiking boots and hiking poles have well and truly been broken in.

Trekking in such chilly conditions didn’t prepare us for what was waiting in Brazil’s most vibrant and misunderstood city though – the world’s biggest monolith, standing tall amid the tropical low-laying clouds was to provide an entirely different challenge for us.

Dressed only in t-shirts and shorts/sports leggings, this hike instantly felt different from our Patagonian treks.

For a start, we caught the metro to the base of the walk (such an easy access point to the trails in Torres del Paine would be unimaginable) and the many, many layers of warm clothes were suddenly a distant memory.   When once we stood shivering as we caught our breath, we now wiped sweat from our brows and guzzled water in a bid to reintroduce some much-needed fluids into our systems.

How Difficult is the Hike to Rio’s Tallest Vantage Point?

I can’t lie – it’s not an easy hike.

The weather makes it a challenge.  The gradient and never-ending trudge upwards makes it difficult.  And that’s not even to mention the free-climbing!

After hiking uphill for a solid few hours, travellers are greeted with what feels like an almost-vertical rock wall.  Let’s face it, it probably wasn’t that extreme but that’s certainly how it felt at the time!  Ropes and ladder rungs help hikers navigate further upwards and before long, they’re greeted by a boulder scramble, edging ever closer to the summit.

Nearing the summit, hikers are rewarded with the most amazing views out over Rio de Janeiro – views that are so good that the hard work and suffering is very quickly forgotten!

From there, there’s one last bout of free-climbing – approximately 35 metres, followed by the final hike to the top.

With aching legs and gusty winds (not to mention, a thunderstorm brewing in the distance), Nathan and I decided to set up camp on the lookout and let our friend Becky continue without us.  It was a decision we’d later come to regret but with clouds descending, we thought she’d have more luck making it to the top without us and of course, we were more than happy with the views we’d been left with.

Understandably, our regret set in the moment we saw Becky’s photos – seriously, look at that view!!

What goes up must come down again and so we began our slow, boulder-climbing, ladder-grabbing descent back to Rio.

What to Take on a Hike up Pedra de Gavea

  • Hiking poles for the trip back down (if you have dodgy knees like me or just need an extra boost)
  • Plenty of water – three litres was the recommendation and I drank most of it easily
  • Good quality food – both lunch and snacks to keep you going
  • Shoes with good grip – hiking boots if possible which also offer ankle support
  • Layers – during the hike itself we didn’t need much in the way of clothes but sitting up the top, the wind picked up and the rain started to fall so our fleeces were put to good use.

We had an amazing time hiking up Pedra de Gavea and though it was a challenge, it was well worth it.  The views were amazing, the jungle was beautiful and we even spotted a group of monkeys!

Though this hike wasn’t originally on our radar, I’m so pleased we added it into the equation and would certainly encourage others travelling to Brazil to do the same.


If you’d like to book an organised tour up to the summit of Pedra de Gavea, we recommend joining Alexis at Discovery Hostel.  He was an amazing guide, taking care of us every step of the way. 

Though hikers are able to summit alone, it’s not recommended unless you have a fair amount of climbing experience.


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Rio de Janeiro is home to an amazing hike with incredible views. It's challenging, including free-climbing but worth every step. One for your bucket list next time you're in Brazil. Rio de Janeiro is home to an amazing hike with incredible views. It's challenging, including free-climbing but worth every step. One for your bucket list next time you're in Brazil.

Thank you to the lovely Becky for supplying her photo at the summit of Pedra de Gavea and for being such fabulous company throughout the hike.

Bolivia Eco Tourism South America Uyuni Salt Flats

Salar de Uyuni Tour, Day 1 – So Much More than a Salt Flat

October 26, 2017

Uyuni, a remote part of Bolivia, draws tourists into Salar de Uyuni to take all manner of creative, perspective-bending photos of its seemingly never-ending horizon.  Whether in the dry season, when the salt flats crack and splinter, or the wet season, when reflections make it difficult to tell land from sky, there’s much more to this region than we initially realised.  Find out how we spent our days with Jukil de los Andes on our Salar de Uyuni tour…

For those looking to explore the salt flats, a range of tours are offered from Uyuni, with something to fit all timeframes and budgets.  The most popular tour from this desert town covers off the major sights over the course of three days/two nights, but everything from a single day trip to four days plus are available.

Though we were initially booked on a three day tour, we added another day at the last minute and couldn’t have been happier with our decision; it resulted in a lot of additional time on the salt flats, an opportunity to snap some gorgeous reflection shots and gave us a birds-eye view our over the expansive Salar de Uyuni after climbing one of the local volcanoes…

More on that later though – first up, let’s take a look at our first day on the salt.

Salar de Uyuni Itinerary – Day 1

Train Cemetry

Though trains once used to run between inland Bolivia and their port town, the country’s rocky history with Chile rendered the railway all but useless many years ago.  With their seaside land commandeered, Bolivia unwillingly become a landlocked country and their trains that once lead to the ocean, now lead nowhere.

This is where those trains came to die.

Fortunately though, the Uyuni tours have brought these old locomotives back to life (so to speak) and if you’re lucky like us, you’ll find yourself there with the majority of the tourists gone and the place practically to yourselves.

Last Minute Supplies

Before stopping off for lunch, we had time for a spot of shopping; everything from souviner salt and plastic dinosaurs (for that perfect salt flat photo) to lama jumpers and knock-off sunnies was available at surprisingly reasonable prices. 

If you’re looking for a little llama or Godzilla prop for your photos, it’s certainly not worth dragging your own around from home when you can pick one up on the spot for BOB15-20 (approx USD2.20).

Entering the Salt Flats

Once you’ve put a fair bit of salt-laden ground behind you, you’ll come across the two first major Salar de Uyuni attractions; the Dakar Rally monument and the infamous international collection of flags.

I must admit, I wasn’t expecting to be particularly blown away by either of these sights but when you’re standing in the middle of what feels like an ever-reaching salt flat, it’s hard not to pinch yourself.

Yes, they’re touristy but they’re also pretty amazing to see!

Salt Flats – The Main Attraction

The crowning glory of these tours, who hasn’t seen a creative salt flat photo online by now?

Salar de Uyuni seems to stretch on endlessly and, thanks to its incredibly flat surface, provides great opportunities to take mind-bending perspective photos.  Be warned though, its bumpy, cracking surface is like sandpaper to the skin and whoever is photographing your group is likely to spend a large amount of time laying flat against the salt – we suggest you wear jeans and a fleece to offer your skin some protection.

Stay tuned for our photography guide to the salt flats so you too can take perfectly focused perspective photos!

Pink Skies and Pink Birds – Sunset Magic

One of the main highlights of extending our Salar de Uyuni tour to four days was to be found as the sun started going down.

The three-day tours gap it from the salt flats pretty quickly, not only limiting your time to take the perfect perspective photos but robbing visitors of the opportunity to take beautiful reflective photos by the lagoon bordering the salt flats.

In the rainy season, the salt flats become an incredible expanse where it’s hard to tell what’s ground and what’s sky.  Clouds reflect in the water, with colours as vivid as the real things.  Unfortunately though, not everybody gets to experience this amazing phenomena… unless of course you book a four-night trip to get a sneak peek of it!

Stargazing

With the city lights a distant memory, we made our way back onto the salt flats and soon found ourselves enveloped in absolute darkness.

I thought I’d seen stars clearly before in the past – I was wrong.

The Milky Way instantly popped out in front of us, as clear as day.  Countless stars twinkled away above us in a moment of pure magic.

Between the stars and the sunset, you have reason enough to ensure a stay out on Salar de Uyuni – believe me, racing off after you take your daytime salt flat photos will mean doing yourself out of an amazing experience.

Reviewing the Finer Details

Accommodation

Though the accommodation provided on our tour was basic, it was adequate.  It certainly didn’t rival some of the amazing places we’ve stayed in the past but the beds surprisingly comfortable and the rooms warm.  As we selected the entry-level tour, we weren’t expecting 5-star accommodation (and nor did we get it) but we were fairly comfortable.

Our first hostel was well located right on the side of Salar de Uyuni so we could make our own way down to take beautiful sunset photos.

The trade-off though?  We were left without any showers and bathrooms that couldn’t exactly be described as clean – especially in the morning when we awoke to find the water had been shut off (to prevent pipes from freezing) all sorts of interesting remnants in the toilets.  Eeeek!

Food

Lunch

Having expected a packed lunch of sandwiches on the road we were pleasantly surprised when we were dished up quinoa, beef, roasted potatoes and steamed veggies for lunch, along with Coke and water.  The fact that we all went back for seconds (and thirds and fourths in Nathan’s case) speaks for itself!

Dinner

With our standards raised from lunch, dinner wasn’t quite as memorable. 

Perfectly cooked pasta was accompanied by an onion-heavy vegetarian bolognese sauce and parmesan cheese. 

Anyone that knows me well knows that onion and I aren’t the best of friends (that’s the understatement of the year!) so I ended up eating cheesy pasta (which was actually better than it sounds). 

Fortunately for us the group next to us couldn’t eat all of their sausages and very kindly offered us some. 

Pro Tip:  If you’re headed out on this tour and meat is a substantial part of your diet, we’d recommend asking if it will be provided or if it’s possible to supply your own to be cooked.

Driver & Car

Having heard horror stories about unsafe driving and cars breaking down left, right and centre, we knew that choosing a company with reliable cars was essential.  We certainly weren’t interested in wasting half a day waiting for our 4WD to be repaired.

It was with caution then, that we checked the Land Cruiser over trying to find fault.  We couldn’t though!

For the duration of the tour, Ivan, our lovely Bolivian guide, drove with caution and care.  He didn’t speak a great deal of English but with our friend Becky on hand to relay what she could and Google Translate filling in the gaps, we made it by just fine.

It would have been great to have had a better idea of exactly what was coming up the next day so we could have dressed appropriately but with our gear on the roof, it was never far away.

Though we thought we knew what to expect from our Salar de Uyuni tour, we were pleasantly surprised by just how diverse and stunning all of the sights were.

There’s no doubt in our mind that booking the four-day itinerary was the right decision for us.

Keep your eyes peeled for the highlights from the following days on the salt flats!


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How long should you spend at the Bolivian Salt Flats? Find out why we recommend the four-night itinerary at Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia. Flamingos, reflections, salt for days and perfect perspective shots - a must for your South American vacation. Day one at Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia.  Find out why we recommend a four day itinerary and what we got up to on the first day of our visit to this amazing region in South America.


Thank you to Backpacking Becky for supplying a couple of her beautiful photos.  A massive thank you also to Jukil de los Andes for hosting us on this tour – as always, all thoughts are our own.

Accommodation Brazil Eco Tourism Paraty South America

The Complete Guide to Paraty, Brazil – Paradise is Only a Bus Ride from Rio!

October 24, 2017

Perched on the shore of Ponta Grossa, skimming its own privately-accessed beach, Happy Hammock is the perfect spot to forget all of your worries. Here, we spent two nights (which wasn’t nearly enough) checking out what Paraty has to offer and falling asleep in their name-sake hammocks…

An easy 25-minute boat ride from the colonial town of Paraty, Happy Hammock is a world away from the hustle and bustle of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, the two monstrous cities this sleepy town sits in the middle of.

With the ever-constant waves lapping at the shore and the distant drone of boats passing by, it’s not difficult to slip into a fabulous state of relaxation. This place is made for it!

What to do in Paraty/Ponta Grossa

With Happy Hammock as a base, guests easily avoid the trappings of local hotspots, instead having the best of Paraty practically to themselves.

We’re not ones to sit back and do nothing on holiday though and being in such a secluded spot, we had wondered if there would be enough for us to do.  Of course, we needn’t had worry – you can do as much or as little as you like there!

Swim with Bioluminescent Plankton

We’d first heard about this natural phenomena in Puerto Rico but due to the full moon during our visit (light pollution makes them much harder to spot) and the inability to actually swim with them there, we decided against paying to join a tour. It was a right decision but something I’ve wanted to do ever since.

Imagine our excitement when we found out that, directly off the dock, visitors to this Paraty guesthouse are treated to an underwater bioluminescent light show. Not only is it free but this natural marvel is literally in stumbling distance!

With someone standing guard and water that felt warmer than the air, we couldn’t resist jumping in two nights in a row. Though we were initially hesitant, all of our reservations slipped away once we put our goggled-heads in the water.

With every kick of our feet and wave of our hands, countless tiny fluorescent dots swirled around us in the darkness.

If there’s one reason you visit this region, make sure it’s this!

Wander the Historical Centre of Paraty

With its cobbled streets and historic churches, a visit to Paraty is a little like taking a step back in time. Built by the Portuguese to flood intentionally once a month (in a bid to clear out the sewerage that would have once been pushed out onto the road), the town’s whitewashed buildings and colourful front doors make for a great afternoon out.

Long gone are the garbage problems but the charm of the historical centre remains.

Hike Across to Praia Vermelha

An easy 30-minute hike from Ponta Grossa will put you out on the shores of Praia Vermelha, a pristine white-sand beach that other tourists pay top-dollar to visit on day cruises. Instead, plan to arrive before 2.30pm and you’ll have the beach practically to yourselves before the makeshift pirateships arrive.

There’s a lovely spot for lunch and though it is expensive, the servings are generous and the food tasty – a portion of fresh battered fish and a root-vegetable chips, each suggested for two, very happily went around three of us.

Relax in Paradise

With hammocks in ready supply and the sound of the waves crashing below, it’s hard to drag yourself away from the comfort of the front deck. Hummingbirds flit around as guests curl up with a good book or one of the National Geographics sitting inside.

It’s fair to say, life by the bay is pretty good.

Where to Stay in Paraty

Though I doubt it needs to be said at this stage, the Happy Hammock is hands-down the place to stay on the coast.

In some ways, this eco guesthouse is relatively simple. The showers don’t always run particularly warm (as they’re at the mercy of solar-heating, as you’d expect) and you won’t find a bedside lamp in sight. Wifi is nonexistent and and the closest accessible shop is back in town.

Honestly though, none of this is an issue – the exact opposite in fact. Happy Hammock absolutely shines in its simplicity and with Patrick at the helm, nothing is a problem.

Home cooked meals are a given and are adapted to suit the needs of his guests. The look of fear in my eyes when we were told a vegetarian meal was coming up that evening resulted in the addition of chicken for me (how sweet is that!) and when our friend Becky explained that she had a few allergies, he was careful to exclude those foods from our meals.

Snorkelling gear and a standup paddle board is available for use at no charge and the boat in and out of town is so affordable that making a trip is really isn’t a problem – why you’d want to leave is beyond me though!

If you’re looking for an international WiFi device, we highly recommend the SkyRoam. With it, you can connect up to five devices at a time and get reliable WiFi practically anywhere you can get cellphone reception, all at a low daily rate… and yes, it works at the guesthouse.

Getting to Paraty

From Rio

Easy Transfer offers reliable and surprisingly affordable transfers direct to Paraty.  Though it’s possible to get on a local bus, the transfers weren’t much more expensive and it meant we didn’t have to make our way through Rio with all of our bags.

From Ilha Grande

Again, private transfers are offered by Easy Transfer and though we found out that it would be a little cheaper to do it ourselves (after we’d purchased our ticket), we wouldn’t have saved much money.

From Sao Paulo

We made this journey in reverse (flying out of Sao Paulo) but doing so was simple. To get to Paraty from the city simply book yourself a seat on a local bus (they only offer one class but they’re comfortable enough).  We travelled from Paraty to Sao Paulo by public overnight but and then purchased a ticket for the airport bus once we reached the Sao Paulo bus terminal.  The airport bus cost practically as much as our longer journey but it got us to the airport quickly and safely.

Getting from Paraty to Ponta Grossa

Once you’re in the township, Patrick will have organised a private transfer for you on his boat. Keep an eye out for the little white boat and his skipper – he’ll make sure you, along with all your luggage, get to the guesthouse safely.  Should you wish to pop back and forth, the boat is available around the clock, with a slight surcharge for journeys made after 7pm.

Don’t Make Rio & Iguazu Your Only Stops in Brazil!

When our lovely Maria returned from Brazil singing the praises of Happy Hammock and Paraty, I was instantly convinced that this little slice of paradise deserved a spot on our travel wishlist.

Having now visited ourselves, there’s absolutely no doubt in my mind that this is one of the most relaxing places we’ve ever had the pleasure of visiting.

The food, the company, the outlook – it’s all perfect.

Sure, the water in the showers doesn’t run piping hot (it is after all warmed via solar panels) and getting to the shops to pick up forgotten items isn’t the easiest of things to do, but there’s magic in its seclusion.

Though we loved Rio and Iguazu and enjoyed Ilha Grande, we wholeheartedly believe that no trip to Brazil is complete without a visit to Paraty.

Happy Hammock, Paraty; giving the happiest place on earth a run for its money since 2015.


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Not far from Rio de Janeiro, Paraty is Brazil's best-kept vacation secret.  This guide shares where to stay, what to do and what to expect.  Snorkelling with bioluminescent plankton, standup paddleboarding and plenty of relaxation, this colonial town is one you don't want to miss whilst in South America. Not far from Rio de Janeiro, Paraty is Brazil's best-kept vacation secret.  This guide shares where to stay, what to do and what to expect.  Snorkelling with bioluminescent plankton, standup paddleboarding and plenty of relaxation, this colonial town is one you don't want to miss whilst in South America.


Thank you to Patrick at Happy Hammock for hosting us for the purpose of this review.  As always, all thoughts are 100% our own.

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