Europe Greece Mykonos

A Magical Day on Mykonos

July 9, 2016

Mykonos is one of the smallest islands in the Cyclades and though it often plays second fiddle to the renowned Santorini, there is plenty to see to warrant a visit to it’s shores.

According to Greek mythology, Hercules slew a number of giants in this area; the large rocks that are found scattered across the island are even said to be their petrified corpses. Mythology and history aside, the gorgeous beaches and stunning weather draw tourists in throughout the year and for good reason. Deep blue, azure waters meet pristine sand and pebble beaches, with the aforementioned rocks scattered throughout the countryside.

The weather for our visit to Mykonos was glorious – temperatures approaching the high twenties (celsius) and a surprisingly strong prevailing wind in places that helped cut through the heat. For those that feel the heat, there are plenty of fantastic opportunities to jump in the ocean to cool off too.

Things to See and Do in Mykonos Town

Mykonos Town, the gateway to the rest of the island, it well worth a visit in itself. Narrow winding streets weave in and out of whitewashed houses and shops, punctuated by the occasional pop of colour in the form of a red church dome or blue door. Mykonos Town is quintessentially Greece and absolutely stunning. Wandering through the maze of buildings, it’s easy to get caught up in the gentle buzz of restaurants, bars, cafes and shops selling a variety of goods.

Mykonos Town has a lovely, inviting feel about it – the perfect combination of energy and calm. The town itself provides countless photo-worthy backdrops but there are also a number of sights that are worth hunting out.

Perhaps the most iconic Mykonos site, the five windmills perched atop the cliff make for awesome photos. Their stark white bases practically glow against the bright blue skyline.

Just down the hill from the windmills, Little Venice is found – these buildings are built out over the water and on a day where the waves kick up as high as they did today, it’s a wonder that they’re still standing!

Mykonos Island is also home to a large number of churches but the most impressive, Panagia Paraportiani, is again not far from the windmills. This church is actually made up of five churches – four of which are found on the ground level and one above. Part of the church dates back to 1425 whilst additions were made in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Exploring the Island by Quad Bike

Walking a little way up from the water, we noticed both private and public buses to certain spots around the island but were lured in by the flexibility that hiring a quad bike would offer us. The quads were €25 (for each bike, hired from Joe’s Club) and can carry two people comfortably. Though bus would have been cheaper, they’d be nowhere near as much fun, nor would we have seen half of what we did, so the decision for us was easy.

From Mykonos Town we set off (via the petrol station) for Ano Mera where we had a little look around the 16th century monastery of Ano Merathe before heading towards the ocean. We called into Elia Bay briefly and then continued onto Agrari where we relaxed on the pebble beach. As we looked down on Agrari, we knew we were onto a good thing at Mykonos – what a striking place!

Next we headed for Super Paradise where we marvelled at the view. We decided not to take the quad down to the beach because of the steep incline – though the bike had plenty of power, it struggled a bit on big hills and with so many glorious beaches around, we didn’t want to push our luck and get stuck.

On we raced, via the airport, to Paradise Beach – our tummies were calling out to us and it was definitely time for lunch. With a number of options to choose from, we decided on the Tropicana Club, set right on the stunning Paradise Beach.  We chilled out, listening to slowed-down dance tunes watching people come and go.  There’s no doubt that Mykonos has a bit of a party atmosphere in places and I can imagine Tropicana going off late afternoon through to the early morning, but whilst we were there it was lovely and calm.

In total we put €10 worth of fuel into the quad which was more than enough to zip us around everywhere we wanted to go. For €35 for the quad and €15 for lunch, the two of us had a fun day in the sun at minimal expense – we’d definitely recommend getting yourself a quad or scooter to help you see Mykonos should you choose to visit. The roads were quiet and safe and the drivers courteous.

If you’re in Mykonos, grab yourself a quad bike and get out there exploring all that this beautiful island has to offer!



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